'Urban Picnic' Bat (2016.8)

Catalogue Record

Collection

Maker

Title

'Urban Picnic' Bat

Made in

London

Date

2010

Description

Bat or paddle, made from beech plywood and veneered with traditional stringing lines to create an intricate repeating pattern across both sides of the object.

Materials and techniques

Birch plywood veneered with traditional stringing lines (marquetry). Veneering lines came from Phillip Cheshire.

Dimensions

length:  36cm
width:  22cm
depth:  1cm

Object number

2016.8

Category

References

CHARNY, D. (2011). Power of making: the importance of being skilled. London, V&A Publishing and the Crafts Council.

Credit

Given by the maker
  • 'Urban Picnic' Bat, Gareth Neal, 2010, © Gareth Neal, Crafts Council Collection: 2016.8. Photo: Stokes Photo Ltd.

  • 'Urban Picnic' Bat, Gareth Neal, 2010, © Gareth Neal, Crafts Council Collection: 2016.8. Photo: Stokes Photo Ltd.

Maker's statement

‘The Vauxhall Collective’ is an annual bursary scheme and one I was lucky enough to win with an idea centered around ‘The Great British Weekend.’ I set about designing a body of playful objects for a series of ‘Urban Picnics’ which popped up in mystery locations in East London, city tarmac and concrete were temporarily transformed into grassy spaces inviting Londoners to meet, mix and consume their picnic under the summer sun. Picnickers entered an interactive and fantastical space featuring traditional weekend fare with a contemporary craft twist. From bat and ball, hula hoops and egg and spoon races, to logs and benches to sit on, the creations intend to bring jaded city dwellers back to their childhood memories of the quintessential British weekend.

The East London area was once home to hundreds of traditional furniture manufacturers, so it’s the perfect location for the project. The objects within their locations refer to this lost industry and claim back pieces of land for relaxation, fun and play.

This piece was exhibited in the most visited free exhibition at the V&A to date (Power of Making) in 2012.

Gareth Neal, 31 May 2016