Vignette No.4 (LI.2020.42)

Catalogue Record

Collection

Maker

Mary Evans

Title

Vignette No.4
Vignette No.5
Vignette No.6

Date

2015

Materials and techniques

Cut paper

Object number

LI.2020.42

Credit

Courtesy of the artist and Tiwani Contemporary
  • Vignette No. 6, Mary Evans, 2015, Courtesy of the artist and Tiwani Contemporary. Photo: Tiwani Contemporary.

    Vignette No. 6, Mary Evans, 2015, Courtesy of the artist and Tiwani Contemporary. Photo: Tiwani Contemporary.

  • Vignette No. 4, Mary Evans, 2015, Courtesy of the artist and Tiwani Contemporary. Photo: Tiwani Contemporary.

    Vignette No. 4, Mary Evans, 2015, Courtesy of the artist and Tiwani Contemporary. Photo: Tiwani Contemporary.

  • Vignette No. 5, Mary Evans, 2015, Courtesy of the artist and Tiwani Contemporary. Photo: Tiwani Contemporary.

    Vignette No. 5, Mary Evans, 2015, Courtesy of the artist and Tiwani Contemporary. Photo: Tiwani Contemporary.

Maker's statement

The figures that populate Evans’s work are approximations of African people. She is engaged in investigating and interrogating the African body as a site for historical and contemporarynarratives of violence, geography, mobility and globalisation. Historically andcontemporaneously the Black body has been treated cheaply: shipped, broken, disposed of andfeared. However, Evans is ultimately concerned with telling stories about the resilience of theBlack body and its ability to endure and prevail despite the challenges meted out to it.

Paper has been Evans’s principle medium for twenty-five years. She deliberately chooses toutilise brown kraft paper because it is cheap and disposable and is generally used to wrapparcels for shipment pertaining directly to the content of her practice.

The Vignette series depicts an array of African figures in various settings such as leaving or entering a plantation house, visiting a graveyard as a ghost or as a living being, stalking thecorridors of a grand building. The intention is to create friction between the unexpected natureor identities of the figures and the more ‘known’ or expected classical European architectural and landscape settings. One might ask ‘are they in the Garden of Eden or are they in the living hell of a plantation’? Evans wants the precision and ornament of the cut work to be a foil to the traumatic narrative being played out in the vignette.