Tall oval-sectioned jug (P485)

Catalogue Record

Collection

Maker

Title

Tall oval-sectioned jug

Made in

Fressingfield

Date

2004

Description

Tall, narrow jug with a cream base glaze, decorated with multicoloured ceramic transfers.

Materials and techniques

The jug is made in a plastic ivory-coloured clay, with an addition of molochite to prevent cracking. It is press-moulded (somewhat Easter egg-like) with the seam running veritcally. Press-moulding is an old technique used extensively for many articles - including the large jugs from the jug-and-bowl sets seen in every Victorian bedroom - until that is, the invention of slip-casting in the latter parts of the nineteenth century. The handle is, in fact, slipcast and applied on the junction seam. While still 'leather-hard', indents were pressed into the surface which were coloured in blue slip in a polka dot arrangement.

If, as often happens with my ceramics, I notice that even after the glaze-firing when the piece is 'finished' in the usable sense of the word, it lacks the quality I believe the Germans call gestalt, I continue working on the surface. In the case of this jug I have done so with ceramic transfers which mean the piece has to be returned to the kiln for a third firing. Pieces can be fired repeatedly (until destruction sometimes) but in this case the three firings - the biscuit firing, the glaze firing and than the enamel firing - seemed sufficient.

Taken from a letter from Colin Saunders, kept in the maker file with the Purchase Information Sheet.

Dimensions

height:  33cm
length:  23cm
width:  11cm

Object number

P485

Category

  • Tall Oval-sectioned Jug, Colin Saunders, 2004. Crafts Council Collection: P485. Photo: Stokes Photo Ltd.

  • Tall Oval-sectioned Jug, Colin Saunders, 2004. Crafts Council Collection: P485. Photo: Stokes Photo Ltd.

  • Tall Oval-sectioned Jug, Colin Saunders, 2004. Crafts Council Collection: P485. Photo: Stokes Photo Ltd.

Maker's statement

I believe that every utilitarian pottery object has wonderful potential for the artist. Prosaic it may sound, but for some while I had been enjoying working on candle-holders and toast-racks but had had little response commercially. Then someone suggested 'people love jugs'. As I do too, I made this series - as different as possible from any of my previous jugs.