Rustic Stool series (2019.14)

Catalogue Record

Collection

Maker

Title

Rustic Stool series

Made in

London

Date

2017

Description

Set of 5 stool iterations, made in yellow coloured high density wood fibre material.

Materials and techniques

The material is a high density wood fibre board (Valchromat) in yellow.
The 8’x4’ sheet material is cut and glue laminated into pieces of rough stock and then milled into textured components using a 3-axis CNC (computer numerically controlled) router. These components are then worked on and assembled into compositions of archetypal rustic log furniture and employing some of the same simple traditional woodworking techniques and tools involved in their making.
Additional stages within the process involve CAD (Computer Aided Design) modelling the basic ‘slab’ and ‘log’ components and stool compositions, and then manipulating the CNC machine’s CAM (computer aided manufacturing) software in order to generate the unique textured surfaces reliefs.
The pieces are sealed with a water based polyurethane varnish.

Dimensions

height (box):  63cm
width (box):  46cm
depth (box):  46cm

Object number

2019.14

Credit

Purchase supported by Art Fund.
  • Rustic Stool series, Mark Laban, 2017. Crafts Council Collection: 2019.14. Photo: Stokes Photo Ltd.

  • Rustic Stool series, Mark Laban, 2017. Crafts Council Collection: 2019.14. Photo: Stokes Photo Ltd.

    Rustic Stool series, Mark Laban, 2017. Crafts Council Collection: 2019.14. Photo: Stokes Photo Ltd.

Maker's statement

I created these stools for the New Designers One Year On exhibition in the year following my master’s at Central Saint Martins.
For me these pieces are design iterations, unrefined experiments. They also signify a level of confidence and commitment I had made towards the design approach and visual language that evolved from work I began producing at the end of my degree.
The inspiration for the pieces comes from archetypal rustic furniture, crafted roughly and simply using the natural forms of wood to create intuitive compositions. I had always been interested in hybrid aesthetics, the juxtaposition of natural vs artificial form, and exploring the relationship between contemporary digital manufacturing technology and traditional making.
I posed the question: what might digitally manufactured rustic furniture actually look like?